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Pain after COVID-19 disappears



The doctor slides the miniature camera into the patient’s right nostril, causing the entire nose to glow red with the bright miniature light.

“It’s kind of itchy, isn’t it?” He asked as he writhed around her nasal cavity, the discomfort causing tears in her eyes and sliding down her cheeks.

Patient Gabriella Forgione did not complain. The 25-year-old pharmacist was delighted to be provoked and poked by a hospital in Nice, southern France, to advance her increasingly urgent task of restoring her sense of smell. With her taste, when she contracted COVID-19 in November, the disease suddenly disappeared, but neither of them returned.

February 8, 2021: Dr. Clair Vandersteen on the right blows a scent tube under the nose of Gabriella Forgione to help during a test at a hospital in Nice, southern France Determine why she can't smell or smell. She has been loving it since she signed for COVID-19 in November 2020.

February 8, 2021: Dr. Clair Vandersteen on the right blows a scent tube under the nose of Gabriella Forgione to help during a test at a hospital in Nice, southern France Determine why she can’t smell or smell. She has been loving it since she signed for COVID-19 in November 2020.
(AP Photo/John Lester)

Facts have proved that the food deprived of pleasure and the aroma of her favorite things make her mind and body unbearable. All smells are good and bad, Forgione is reducing weight and enhancing self-confidence.

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She admits: “Sometimes I ask myself,’Do I get stinky?’. “Usually, I wear perfume and like to smell good. The unsmelling smell bothers me very much. “

One year after entering the coronavirus pandemic, doctors and researchers are still working to better understand and treat the epidemic of anemia associated with COVID-19-loss of smell-more and more people who feel frustrated for a long time There is a lot of happiness in life for victims like Forgione.

Even specialist doctors said that there are still many illnesses, and they still don’t know that they are learning while making diagnosis and treatment. The weakening and alteration of odor has become so common in COVID-19 that some researchers suggest that in countries with few laboratories, a simple odor test can be used to track coronavirus infections.

For most people, smell problems are temporary and usually improve on their own within a few weeks. But a small number of people complained of dysfunction long after other COVID-19 symptoms disappeared. Some reports say that the odor continues to disappear completely or partially after six months of infection. Some doctors say that the longest period is now approaching a year.

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Researchers working to treat the troublesome disability say they are optimistic that most people will eventually recover, but worry that some will not recover. Some doctors worry that an increasing number of patients who lack smell (many of whom are young) may be more prone to depression and other difficulties, and put pressure on the health system.

Thomas Hummel, head of the Odor and Taste Clinic at the University Hospital of Dresden, Germany, said: “Their lives are losing color.”

Hummel added: “These people will survive and will succeed in their careers.” “But their lives will be even poorer.”

At the Face-to-face and Neck University College in Nice, Dr. Clair Vandersteen puts a camera around his nostrils and puffs his nose under Fogioni’s nose.

February 8, 2021: Researchers hold a small bottle of perfume used in the test in a clinic in Nis, France.

February 8, 2021: Researchers hold a small bottle of perfume used in the test in a clinic in Nis, France.
(AP Photo/John Lester)

He asked, “Do you feel any smell? Nothing? Zero? Okay?” She replied repeatedly and apologetically.

Only the last test tube caused a clear response.

“It’s great! Oh, that’s too smelly.” Fudgeon shouted. “fish!”

After the test was completed, Vandersteen made a diagnosis.

He told her: “You need a lot of smell to smell something.” “You haven’t completely lost your sense of smell, but it’s not very good.”

He sent her to do her homework: six months of olfactory repair. He ordered, twice a day, choose two to three scented things, such as a bunch of lavender or a few jars of perfume, and smell it for two to three minutes.

He said: “If you smell something, that’s great. If not, then there is no problem. Try again and concentrate on drawing the lavender and blooming beautiful purple.” “You have to persevere.”

Loss of smell will not only cause inconvenience. Spreading fires, gas leaks or smoke from rotten food can all be dangerously ignored. It is embarrassing to ignore the smoke from used diapers, dog dirt on shoes or sweaty armpits.

As poets have long known, smells and emotions are often entangled like lovers.

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Evan Cesa used to like dining. Now they are in trouble. A fish feast in September suddenly seemed tasteless. It first told an 18-year-old sports student that COVID-19 had violated his senses. Food is just texture, only a little bit sweet and salty.

Five months later, Cesa was eating breakfast on chocolate chip cookies before class, but still chewed unhappily, as if swallowing cardboard.

He said: “Diet no longer serves me any purpose.” “It’s just a waste of time.”

Cesa is one of the anorexic patients being studied by Nice researchers. Before the pandemic, the patient had been using smell to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease. After the truck terrorist attack in Nice in 2016, they also used soothing fragrance to treat children’s post-traumatic stress. At that time, a driver plowed a field among holiday crowds, killing 86 people.

Now, the researchers have turned their expertise to COVID-19, collaborating with perfumers in the nearby perfume production town of Grasse. Perfume Aude Galouye is dedicated to processing the aromatic wax floating under Cesa’s nose to measure his olfactory disorders and use different concentrations of scents.

Galloer said: “The sense of smell is a fundamentally forgotten feeling.” “Obviously, unless we no longer have it, we won’t realize its impact on our lives.”

The examination of Cesa and other patients also includes language and attention tests. Researchers in Nice are exploring whether olfactory complaints are related to COVID-related cognitive difficulties (including inattention). When “kayaking” was the obvious choice in a test, Cesa stumbled upon the word “ship”.

The team’s speech therapist Magali Payne said: “This is completely unexpected.” “This young man should not have language problems.”

She said: “We must continue to dig.” “We discovered the problem while seeing the patient.”

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Cesa is eager to revive his senses, celebrating the taste of pasta with Italian sauces, his favorite dishes and running amidst the fragrant wonders of the outdoors.

He said: “Some people may think that smelling the smell of nature, trees, and forests is not important.” “But when you lose your sense of smell, you will realize how lucky we are to smell these things.”


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