قالب وردپرس درنا توس
Home / Science / New research suggests that polar flips can be catastrophic-BGR

New research suggests that polar flips can be catastrophic-BGR



  • The magnetic poles on the earth are always moving, but their drift is not high enough to make them truly flipped in the modern era.
  • Researchers know that the poles of the earth have been flipped in the past, but there are disagreements on what impact this event might have on the earth and its inhabitants.
  • Now, new research shows that the magnetic pole reversal about 42,000 years ago brought some huge changes and may have changed the course of human history.

The disaster movie shows us what Hollywood thinks would happen if the poles of the earth suddenly flipped over, but the reality of this situation may be very different. We are not sure what impact the earth’s magnetic poles will have on daily life if the earth’s magnetic poles suddenly become inoperative, but scientists are always looking for evidence of past polar motions in order to better understand our expectations.

A new study was published in science A very old tree provides us with some useful information. The tree was still growing at the time of the last magnetic pole flip about 42,000 years ago, which implies that dramatic and possibly catastrophic changes have taken place in the atmosphere and the earth’s surface.

Today̵

7;s special Amazon shoppers are obsessed with these black AccuMed masks-never at such a low price! Price List:$26.25 price:$19.99 you save:$6.26 (24%) BGR can be obtained from Amazon, commission may be charged Buy now Commissions may be charged for available products from Amazon BGR

As NPR According to the report, scientists can use a dead but well-preserved tree to better understand the history of the earth. By studying the annual rings of trees, scientists have obtained a detailed record of approximately 1,700 years. The tree happened to be alive during the most recent magnetic pole flip, and analysis of these rings shows that this is a challenging time for anything living on earth.

The team specifically looked for carbon signatures on the rings of the tree. When cosmic rays can hit the Earth’s atmosphere, scientists will look for the type of carbon. When today’s Earth’s magnetic field is strong, the amount of carbon produced by this interaction is relatively low, but when the magnetic field weakens and allows more cosmic rays to pass through, the peak carbon will increase.

Researchers were able to find a large amount of this special type of carbon in the tree’s ring during the polar flip, indicating that this event is directly related to the sharp change in the strength of the earth’s magnetic field.

“This record shows that the carbon-14 content in the atmosphere, which eventually reaches the highest concentration, increases significantly during the period of the weakening of the magnetic field before the polarity switch,” science Explanation. “The author modeled the consequences of this event and concluded that the smallest geomagnetic field will cause a substantial change in atmospheric ozone concentration, leading to simultaneous changes in the global climate and environment.”

Researchers believe that this event will bathe the earth in ultraviolet radiation due to the weakening of the magnetic field and subsequent destruction of the ozone layer. It may even trigger the extinction of many species. We still have no way of knowing when or why the magnetic pole flipped, but whenever it happens again, we may be sad.

Today’s special These fashionable masks have never been sold, and now they only cost $2 each! Price List:$26.75 price:$19.99 ($2.00/count) you save:$6.76 (25%) BGR can be obtained from Amazon, commission may be charged Buy now Commissions may be charged for available products from Amazon BGR

Mike Wehner has covered technology and video games in the past decade, covering major news and trends in VR, wearables, smartphones and future technologies. Recently, Mike served as the technical editor of The Daily Dot, and has gained attention in USA Today, Time.com, and countless other online and print shops. His love of reporting is second only to his addiction to games.




Source link