Gasoline prices continue to rise, erases some of America's tax-saving savings, fuel economy is suddenly important again.

The national average of $ 2.86 per gallon was 52 cents higher than a year ago, according to AAA.

With oil prices boosting pump prices and demand for summer vacations only weeks away, lead-free lead could reach $ 3 a gallon by Memorial Day, says Patrick DeHaan, Se Nior Petroleum Fuel savings analyst App GasBuddy.

This is a crucial economic factor for Americans driving an average of more than 1,000 miles per month.

Current trends fueling both oil and gasoline growth include: Crude oil concerns Concerns about President Trump's decision to withdraw from the Iranian nuclear program and resume sanctions against the oil-rich country. The organization of oil-exporting countries has also kept production limits even though global economic growth has increased demand.

The good news: Gas is still well below the all-time high of 2008 at $ 4.11.

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But with the rapid transition of Americans to crossover vehicles, SUVs and pickup trucks fall the driving cars on the track. Toyota North America CEO Jim Lentz recently said that, after gas prices fell to around US $ 2 a gallon across the country in 2016, the number of petrol cars on the list of factors weighed by car buyers declined sharply.

However, when gas starts again, many drivers will feel pump pain despite recent improvements in fuel economy for SUVs.

At its current price, the cost of gas for 1,000 miles of driving would be $ 150.53 for a Chevy Tahoe, a big SUV. A year ago, it would have been $ 123.16, and if prices shot up to $ 4.11, it would reach $ 216.32.

For a small car like the Honda Civic, the gas cost for 1,000 miles is $ 79.44. And a year ago it would have been $ 65. At $ 4.11 per gallon it would jump to $ 114.17

Here is a breakdown of the cost of driving one of the best-selling models in every major automotive category, from the best to the worst:

Hybrid car: Toyota Prius

Model details : 1.8 liter, 4 cylinder

Miles per gallon (combined city / highway): 52

Gas for 1,000 miles today : $ 55

Gas for 1,000 miles a year ago : $ 45

Gas for 1,000 miles at [19659026] All Time High Price of $ 4.11 : $ 79.04

Compact car: Honda Civic

Details of the model : 1.5 liter, 4-cylinder turbo [19659006] miles per gallon (combined city / highway): 36

gas for 1,000 miles today : $ 79.44

gas for 1,000 miles a year ago : $ 65

gas for 1,000 miles at all time high price of $ 4.11 : $ 114.17

Subcompact: 2018 Nissan Versa

Details of the model : 1.6-liter, 4-cylinder

miles per gallon (combined city / Highway): 34

Gas for 1,000 miles today : $ 84.12

Gas for 1,000 miles a year ago : $ 68.82

Gas for 1,000 Miles at [19659026] all-time high price of $ 4.11 : $ 120.88

Mid-size sedan: Toyota Camry

Details of the model : 2.5-liter, 4-cylinder

Miles per gallon (combined city / highway): 34

Gas for 1,000 miles today : $ 84.12

Gas for 1,000 miles a year ago : $ 68.82

Gas for 1,000 miles at all time high price of $ 4.11 : $ 120.88

Subcompact Crossover: 2018 Buick Encore

Details of the model : 1.4 liter, 4-cylinder turbo

miles per gallon (combined city / Highway): 30

Gas for 1,000 miles today : $ 95.33

Gas for 1,000 miles a year ago : $ 78

Gas for 1,000 Miles of All Time High Price of $ 4.11 : $ 137

Compact SUV / Crossover: Toyota RAV4

Details of the model : 2.5-liter 4-cylinder engine

Miles per gallon (combined city / highway): 26

Gas for 1,000 miles today : $ 110

Gas for 1,000 miles a year ago : $ 90

Gas for 1,000 miles at All time High price from $ 4.11 : $ 158.08


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