قالب وردپرس درنا توس
Home / Entertainment / Former WeWork CEO Adam Neumann plans secret new “pandemic” business

Former WeWork CEO Adam Neumann plans secret new “pandemic” business



Don’t exclude Adam Neumann.

The little-known former WeWork CEO may have lost his empire, but an insider told The Post that Neumann, now 41, is already planning his mysterious next business move.

A person familiar with the matter said: “This relates to the world that has occurred due to the pandemic.” “He has grand plans, and he is waiting for the right time to announce these plans.”

According to reports, Neumann has not yet seen the buzzing new Hulu documentary “WeWork: Or the Making and Disappearance of a $47 Billion Unicorn”, which details his role as the CEO of a once-hot office space startup. The rise and fall of officials.

In the documentary, the entrepreneur was portrayed as a charismatic but deceived liar. He persuaded financial tycoons and shaky people (from Chase Bank’s Jamie Dimon to Softbank’s CEO Sun Zhengyi) to guide him. And provide him with billions of dollars for him to use on WeWork.

An insider told The Post that close friends and family members “described”

; the film to him, but the interesting child prodigy did not watch or read about him.

Instead, he wandered around the house in Greenwich Village with his wife Rebekah and five children, working on this “new” business.

Since Neumann left the company in September 2019, his public office space company has not publicly commented six weeks after submitting the IPO documents, and its valuation has reached an impressive 47 billion US dollars. But in the next month, the company’s valuation fell by half, and because of news that the company was losing money and its growth expectations were very optimistic, the IPO failed. Added: Reports on Neumann’s rock and roll activities, including wild consumption and marijuana use on private jets, and financial irregularities.

According to a report in the Wall Street Journal, Neumann was paid $1.7 billion for cutting off most of the links with WeWork.

He was also widely ridiculed about the idea of ​​wishing to live forever and calling WeWork (essentially an office space leasing business) “enhancing world awareness”.

After losing business, the family and their nanny went to Israel to settle for several months. The source said that the Neumann family’s move to “simplify” their lives was to sell at least three of the six properties they reported, valued at US$90 million, including one of the Hamptons, Wei A house in Chester and the luxurious Gramercy Park compound.

Adam Neumann co-founded WeWork with co-founder Miguel McKelvey in 2010, and he is hardly mentioned in the documentary.
Adam Neumann co-founded WeWork with co-founder Miguel McKelvey in 2010, and he is hardly mentioned in the documentary.
Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

But three people who knew Neumann, who grew up in a kibbutz in Israel, told The Post that he did not lick his wounds, nor hide his head in shame, despite his net worth. After the plunge, it will be listed on the Forbes billionaire list in 2020 from the highest of US$14 billion to US$750 million.

A source familiar with the situation told The Post: “He does feel that he has made a mistake, but he also feels that the media has caused a sensation from certain content of the story.”

“The $47 billion valuation may be a mistake. But WeWork is still a good company. He built his own company…it has hundreds of locations. I don’t know that there are too many people who can build such a company in 10 years. .”

Now it is said that after selling three of the six properties, Neumann and Rebekah lived in a townhouse in Greenwich Village.
Now it is said that after selling three of the six properties, Neumann and Rebekah lived in a townhouse in Greenwich Village.
Helayne Seidman

He also got the support of some unlikely people.

Jamie Hodari, CEO and co-founder of WeWork’s competitor Industrious, recently wrote on LinkedIn: “I feel weird when defending (sometimes a handful of) competitors, but I am worried about these WeWork documents and movies.”

Hodari told The Post that he believed Neumann’s problematic reputation had unfairly smoothed out WeWork’s overall image.

Hodari said: “Aside from Adam’s professional performance, you can’t ignore the fact that this guy built a company with a market value of 9 billion US dollars.” “Very few people do this in such a short period of time.”

Mick McConnell, the former senior vice president of WeWork, is no longer in contact with Neumann. He told The Post that he believed Neumann was over-demonized.

McConnell said: “Adam has assembled a team of people who have never met before.” “We have productized space (this is something that has never been done before), and since then Changes to the architecture and development methods. As people start to work more outside the office, working together will become more important.”

In 2010, Neumann and co-founder Miguel McKelvey (Miguel McKelvey) and Gwyneth Paltrow’s cousin and wife Rebecca, who were barely mentioned in the documentary (Rebekah) co-founded WeWork.

Rebekah, 42 years old, is a former aspiring actress and yoga instructor who has been featured in the documentary and the recent biography of Reeves Wiedeman’s husband “Billion Dollar Loser” Portrayed as a toxic new age lady Macbeth.

According to Wiedeman, Rebekah’s fingerprints were a key element of the company’s implosion in August 2019, when WeWork filed the S-1 form before the planned IPO.

The Neumanns did not seem to worry about the document code-named “Wingspan” showing the US$1.6 billion loss of our work, which shocked investors. Instead, Rebekah Neumann, the chief brand and influence officer, commissioned Vanity Fair photographers to work in the WeWork space for Anna Faris, Aimee Song, and Ron. · Celebrities and influencers such as Ron Howard and Arianna Huffington took photos and included them in the file.

It is said that Adam Neumann is planning the next move: a secret enterprise affected by the pandemic.
It is said that Adam Neumann is planning the next move: a secret enterprise affected by the pandemic.
Michael Kovac/Getty Images for WeWork

A person familiar with the couple said that some people expected Neumann to abandon Rebecca after leaving the company awkwardly.

The source said: “There is no way.” “Adam and Rebecca are committed to each other and to those children. There is no greater contrast to how Adam is publicly portrayed and that he is a person with a family.”

According to reports, Rebekah founded a “conscious entrepreneurship school” for children in WeWork called “WeGrow”. Since WeWork has been sold, Rebekah hopes to rebrand and restart it as a new enterprise called “Students for Life” or SOLFL (pronounced “soulful”). WeGrow’s rights were returned to her.

At the same time, a partner said that Neumann, who has not received treatment or any type of rehabilitation, has invested in many start-ups, including technology mortgage services, residential concierge services called Alfred and Some Israeli companies.

Together with his wife Rebekah and five children, they work at their home in Greenwich Village and are engaged in this
Together with his wife Rebekah and five children, they work at their home in Greenwich Village and are engaged in this “brand new” business.
David X Prutting / PatrickMcMullan.com

In order to facilitate the transaction between the head of a special purpose acquisition company and SoftBank (now a majority stake in WeWork), he also walked out of his house in November, which laid the foundation for his former company’s upcoming $9 billion IPO.

After the first failed public offering attempt, SoftBank initially bailed out WeWork.

“[Adam’s] Still a positive and happy person. “A colleague told The Post. “He feels humble, yes, but he stays here. “


Source link